Signs a loved one may be struggling with debt

 

We recently received an email from a concerned reader, who had questions about some mail a loved one had been receiving. This family member had had some trouble with debt a number of years ago. Now they were receiving letters from companies claiming to offer “credit card relief.”

“Obviously I want to believe him when he says he doesn't owe debt right now,” the writer goes on to say, “but it's pretty obvious I have my doubts because I am asking you for advice. Why do those letters come? Is he in debt right now? How much debt does one accumulate and for how long before those letters start coming?”

What do these letters mean?

It’s understandable to be concerned about a loved one who’s previously struggled with debt – especially if they’ve been inclined to try and hide their problems in the past. However, letters simply promoting some form of debt repayment program are not a clear indication of a current problem.

“Credit card relief” is another way to say debt settlement. Companies offering debt settlement or credit card relief to consumers who have struggled with debt in the past are essentially just advertising their services to the population most likely to need those services. It has nothing to do with someone’s actual current circumstances. Keep in mind, a debt settlement company does not have the right to pull someone’s credit report, so there’s no way for them to know who is in debt and who isn’t.

It is possible, though, that the debt settlement company sent these letters as the result of a direct inquiry from the consumer. The family member in question may have contacted the settlement company looking for information about the solutions they offer and received the letters as a result. If this were the case, obviously it would be an indication that they are at least concerned about their debt.

Clear warning signs

Here’s the part of the article where I remind everyone that you really shouldn’t be going through someone else’s mail. Stealing mail and tampering with mail are both felony offenses. And while there’s no law against taking a good long look at the unopened envelope of a letter addressed to someone else living in your house, you should always strive to do your best to respect the privacy of others.

That said, if you notice a loved one has started receiving letters from companies you can identify as collection agencies, that’s an indication they may be struggling with debt. If they begin receiving multiple phone calls a day that they either ignore or hang up on immediately, that could be a sign that someone is attempting to collect on an unpaid debt.

Additionally, if someone has recently made a number of purchases that seem to be beyond their financial circumstances, or if their income has dropped or ceased, but they continue spending as normal, those may also be signs of a developing problem with credit and debt.

In any case, if you have reason to believe that someone you care about may be struggling with debt, your best bet is to simply let them know that you’re there, that no one is judging them, and that help is available should they need it.

Jesse Campbell is the Content Manager at MMI, focused on creating and delivering valuable educational materials that help families through everyday and extraordinary financial challenges.

  • The Consumer Federation of America (CFA) is an association of nonprofit consumer organizations that was established in 1968 to advance the consumer interest through research, advocacy, and education. Today, nearly 300 of these groups participate in the federation and govern it through their representatives on the organization's Board of Directors.
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