Savvy ways to save on groceries

Note: This guest post was written by Tommye White, Sr. Director at Money Management International.

Even though I like to think of myself as a smart shopper, I am like others when I get to the check-out at the grocery store: shocked that my bill is so high for the small amount of groceries I have in my cart.

I feel like I do a pretty good job of purchasing the most for the least amount of money, but I have tried the following three things below to push the envelope.

  1. I take a quick look at what I have in my pantry and refrigerator before I go to the store. Many times I find that leftover squash or a bit of chicken that I can use to make a new meal with only one or two purchased ingredients. I just jot down what I have on a piece of paper for reference when I get to the store.
  2. I am starting to buy more frozen vegetables. They are less likely to spoil from my neglect or lack of organization.
  3. I take a few minutes to look over the flyers at the grocery store. They are usually right by the front door and you can snag one and sit outside or find a quiet corner and just scan them. This eliminates the need to purchase newspapers if you would not otherwise read it. I have also signed up for email notifications from my top two stores so that I receive information about specials.

The good news is I saved about 5 percent of my total grocery bill last week just by being a little savvy.

I am using the ingredients on hand more, cooking a little more creatively, and have a bit more cash in my wallet.

Not a bad deal for only a few extra minutes of my time!

What about you? How do you save money on groceries? Share your tips in the comment section below!


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For extra tips for frugal foodies, download our free Cheap Eats eBook!

 

Jessica Horton is a former copywriter and community manager at MMI.

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