The Secret to a Quarantine Staycation that’s Actually Fun

Father camping indoors with his young kids

Did you have to nix summer plans to Cabo because of the pandemic? Or maybe that scenic trip up the Pacific Coast via train has been put on hold. If your vacation plans have been waylaid, how can you enjoy a vacation without straying too far from your stomping grounds?

While many places in the U.S. are starting to allow businesses to reopen, and stay-at-home mandates have been relaxed to safer-at-home orders, if you’re playing it safe and trying to minimize the risk for yourself and others, you probably won’t be traveling anytime soon.

To help fill that summertime void, we’ve drummed up some ideas for a fun quarantine staycation:

Break Out of Your Routine

While maintaining healthy habits and routines can be a good thing, there are also benefits to mixing things up. Studies reveal that routines can set us in autopilot. It could mean losing touch with your emotions and senses.

During your staycation, find small ways to break out of your daily doldrums. Take a different route on your neighborhood walk, and hone in on one of your senses. For example, take deep breaths while you take a stroll around the neighborhood. Smell different flowers and plants on your walk. Or order dishes from local restaurants that you’ve never tried before. Has it been years since you’ve hopped on your bike? Dust it off and take it for a spin.

Breaking out of your routine could be as simple as switching rooms you sleep in during your staycation. It might sound a bit silly, but waking up from a sleeping bag in your living room floor, or letting the kids sleep in the master bedroom, could be enough to enliven your senses.

Go on a Mission-Based Staycation

Give your staycation a twist by centering your trip around a mission. See if you can find the best sandwich in town by ordering takeout at a few of the best cafes and sandwich shops on Yelp. Or if you have a sweet tooth, see if you can go on a hunt for the best chocolate caramel cupcake in your area.

I’ve gone on little themed-based missions where I live in search of the best donut or pastor taco. It’ll help you discover new eats in your neighborhood and give you an excuse to check out the menu of a restaurant you might’ve previously overlooked.

Host a Week of Movie Nights

If you live in a household of cinephiles,have you and each member of your family choose a movie you can watch together. If you live alone, you can organize a group viewing party on Netflix Party or Disney Plus Party. Toss together a charcuterie board featuring a spread of your favorite meats and cheeses. And have plenty of treats on hand for the kids.

If you and your family are a bunch of art lovers, enjoy virtual tours of museums.

Put on Your Culinary Cap

If you love to cook, think of recipes you’ve wanted to try. See if you can recreate dishes in the region or country you were planning to travel to this summer. With the extra time on your hands, ferment some napa cabbage and make some homemade kimchi. Or dice up some ginger, and add sugar and water and make your own ginger bug to create homemade ginger ale.

Camp in Your Backyard

Pitch a tent in your backyard and cook up some hot dogs or roast smores over your grill. When it gets dark, you can gather around and tell spooky stories. During the day, you can romp about outside and form designated areas for play, art and crafts, and rest and relaxation.

Get Off Your Computer

If you’re burnt out from all those Zoom calls during the quarantine, limit time spent on electronic devices. Go on a social media break, and don’t answer work emails if possible. And treat your staycation just like you were taking a proper holiday. Put up an “I’m on vacation” auto-responder on your work email, and try not to think about work.

Explore Local Nature

Whether it’s a hiking trail or urban park, spend some time outdoors. You can pack up a picnic lunch and inhale some fresh air and learn about flora and fauna in your area.

Before you venture out, check online to see if your chosen outdoor spot is indeed open and if there have been any adjustments in the hours. And of course, be sure to practice social distance, wear a mask when outdoors, wash your hands frequently, and carry hand sanitizer with you.

Come Up With a Plan for the Money Saved

If you’ve had to cancel summer travel plans, see if you can get a refund for that airfare or train ticket. And because you’re saving money by not traveling, those funds can go toward another goal. Which of your money goals is most pressing? For instance, you could squirrel it away into an e-fund, or put it toward debt repayment. If you can afford to, consider tucking it away for next year’s vacation fund.

Whatever you decide to do for your quarantine staycation, focus on what it is about travel that you enjoy. Maybe it’s seeing new sights, exploring new terrain, trying fresh cuisines, spending time with your family, or taking a break from work. While you might not be able to travel, creating a staycation that’s rooted in what’s most important to you will make for time off at home that provides what you need.

Tagged in Vacation and travel, Coronavirus, Navigating change

Jackie Lam - author photo

Jackie Lam is an L.A.-based personal finance writer who is passionate about helping creatives with their finances. Her work has appeared in Forbes, Mental Floss, Business Insider, and GOOD. She blogs at heyfreelancer.com.

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